You asked: Can you scuba dive with a cold?

Can I go scuba diving with a cold?

When it happens the upper respiratory system swells, becomes congested with mucus and often the eustachian tubes and sinuses become blocked. Hence the danger of diving with a cold. … So, diving with a cold is not recommended.

Can you scuba dive with a cough?

If your cough involves expectorating congestion or mucus from throat or lungs, I suggest you not dive. Without being vivid, you could “aspirate your expectoration” and choke or gag. Also, a persistent “dry cough” suggests, as noted above, that diving should be left to another day.

How do you get rid of congestion before diving?

Nasal Saline Spray

A couple of squirts up each nostril before you dive may irrigate your sinuses enough to provide relief and allow you to equalize them efficiently. One downside is that nasal sprays may not always reach all the way into the sinuses.

Can you take a decongestant before scuba diving?

Nasal decongestants are generally not a good idea under water: most wear off too rapidly and you may wind up with a ‘rebound’ effect, and in worse condition than when you started. People who require decongestants in order to dive are already at increased risk of injury due to higher pressure (barotrauma).

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What happens if you cough while scuba diving?

It’s perfectly alright to cough into your regulator until your airway is clear. If you feel that tell tale tickle in the back of your throat, try to move into an open area where you won’t bump into anything. Also, be aware of your buoyancy as you may unknowingly hold your breath.

Can you scuba dive with allergies?

In general, individuals with environmental allergies may dive safely. Only during severe flare-ups should the symptoms preclude the safe use of scuba equipment.

What happens if you vomit while scuba diving?

The loss of fluids can contribute to dehydration, the movement of vomit through the esophagus temporarily closes the airway, and the rapid expulsion of air and vomit can cause quite a strain on the stomach, ears, and top/back of the head.

Can you use nasal spray before diving?

Nasal sprays work fairly quickly, so it’s best to take them just before gearing up. When stacking antihistamines and decongestants, take the allergy medicines the night before your dive; then take decongestants as you normally would on dive day.

What is a decongestant good for?

Decongestants are medicines that help relieve a congested (stuffy) nose. The congestion can be caused by a cold virus or by the flu, sinusitis, or allergies.