How hard is it to learn to kite surf?

How long does it take to learn to kite surf?

Learning to kitesurf might take between 6 to 12 hours of lessons – but take this with a grain of salt. It often takes more than 12 hours and it rarely takes less than 6. But don’t let this discourage you! After all, no one is born with the ability to fly a kite.

Can anyone learn to kite surf?

A person of any age, weight, height, gender, and physical strength can learn to kitesurf provided they are reasonably healthy, feel comfortable in the water, have decent aerobic endurance, balancing skills, and coordination ability.

Do you need to be a good swimmer to kitesurf?

To be a kiteboarder, you need the following: Swimming Skills: You must be a reasonably strong swimmer and be very comfortable in the water. … Kiteboarding does not have to take over your life, but you do have to be willing to put the time in to learn the sport and wait for good conditions.

Can old people kite surf?

So far, with over ten years of teaching experience, we can honestly say that you are never too old to learn to kitesurf. We have successfully taught hundreds of people over 40 years of age to kitesurf, both male and female.

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How strong do you have to be to kitesurf?

Generally speaking, the average kiteboarder needs about 12mph of wind to get up and ride. Lighter riders can stay upwind and ride in less wind, while heavier riders (over 200lbs) may need 15mph. Modern race boards and race kites can get a skilled rider ripping in under 10mph, but this is the exception, not the rule.

Is kite surfing bad for your back?

We kiteboarders are likely to suffer back pain at one point or another throughout our kitesurfing life. Whether such back problems are due to kiteboarding or not, they can greatly impact our ability to keep riding and can sometimes keep us out of the water for long periods.

Is kitesurfing the same as kiteboarding?

As previously mentioned, kiteboarding is the dry version of kitesurfing, and has been around for as long, or perhaps even longer, then kitesurfing. Instead of using a kitesurfing board, kiteboarders use a skateboard with large wheels, this providing them with plenty of ground clearance to whizz across the beach on.