How deep can you dive without having to decompress?

What is the safest depth to dive?

The industry standard depth limit for recreational divers is 130 feet (39 m) at sea level. During the basic scuba certification, students experience depths of 30-60 feet (9-18 m), and a “deep” dive is considered more than 60 feet (18 m). “Going deep” is not an end in itself for scuba enthusiasts.

At what depth is a safety stop required?

Divers should make a safety stop at the end of every dive at a depth of 15 feet for three to five minutes. Safety stop diving gives your body extra time to release excess nitrogen that builds up in your system during the dive.

How do free divers decompress?

Free divers really don’t have to worry about decompression sickness (the bends) because they are not breathing compressed air underwater. They are simply taking a breath of air at the surface, descending, and returning to the surface with that same breath of air. Things just go back to normal.

Can you get the bends in 10 feet of water?

How great is the risk? About 40 percent of the bent divers made a single dive with only one ascent. The shallowest depth for a single dive producing bends symptoms was ten feet (three meters), with the bottom time unknown. However, most of the divers made several shallow dives and sometimes multiple ascents.

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Can you scuba dive at the Titanic?

You cannot scuba dive to the Titanic due to its depth at 12,500 feet. Air consumption: one standard tank lasts 15 minutes at 120 feet. Supply for 12,500 feet would be impossible to carry even with a team. The deepest dive on record with special equipment, training and a support team is 1,100 feet.