How deep can you dive on air?

How deep can you dive without decompression stops?

There’s a bit of physics and physiology involved in a full explanation, but the short answer is: 40 metres/130 feet is the deepest you can dive without having to perform decompression stops on your way back to the surface.

Can you dive in the air?

Divers have to limit their oxygen exposure to a maximum partial pressure of 1.4 ppO2 in order to avoid Central Nervous System (CNS) toxicity. At high pressure, oxygen interferes with neural function and will cause convulsions. This 1.4 ppO2 limit equates to a 56.6m/185ft maximum depth when breathing air (21% O2).

How long can I dive at 30 feet?

BSAC and PADI no-stop dive times:

9 metres (30 feet) dive depth: BSAC no decompression time limit of 243 minutes (PADI Tables 205 minutes).

Why do divers use more air at depth?

A diver will use up their available air more quickly the deeper they go. The greater the ambient pressure, the more rapidly a diver’s body tissues will absorb nitrogen. … Because pressure becomes greater with depth, both air consumption rates and nitrogen absorption increase the deeper a diver goes.

What is considered a deep dive?

By recreational diving standards and according to PADI, any dive that exceeds 18 meters/ 60 feet and does not exceed 40 m/ 130 feet is considered a deep-water dive. However, you need to do the Deep Diver Specialty to get the skills to dive under 30 meters/ 100 feet.

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