Can you swim butterfly in a freestyle event?

What is faster butterfly or freestyle?

What are the technical differences between freestyle and butterfly swimming? Freestyle times (46.91 WR for 100m) tend to be faster than butterfly (49.82 WR for 100m) times.

Can you swim whatever stroke you want in freestyle?

The term “freestyle” means that you can swim in any style he likes. In a technical sense, you are free to swim backstroke, sidestroke or any other stroke you choose in a freestyle race. The exception to this rule is during a medley event in which you are already swimming backstroke, butterfly and breaststroke.

Can you swim anything during freestyle?

FREESTYLE: The swimmer may swim any style, except that in individual medley or medley relay events, freestyle means any style other than backstroke, breaststroke or butterfly. Some part of the swimmer must touch the wall upon completion of each length and at the finish.

Is freestyle a swimming stroke?

Yes! Freestyle is not actually a stroke but a category in swimming competitions. The most common stroke in freestyle races is front crawl, because it’s the fastest, which is how the term freestyle has become a synonym for front crawl.

Why would you ever swim butterfly?

The history of butterfly stroke started in the 1930s when it developed as a style of swimming breaststroke. Swimmers and coaches began to realise that breaststroke was quicker when a swimmer recovered their arms forward above the water and the arm technique – as well as the swimming term ‘butterfly’ – was born.

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Are flip turns legal in butterflies?

In butterfly and breaststroke races, regulations require swimmers to touch the end of the pool with both hands simultaneously before turning back for another length. While they legally can flip turn during butterfly and breaststroke races, it is more common to turn left or right to begin the next lap.

Is butterfly the fastest swimming stroke?

Swimming statistics show freestyle remains the fastest stroke, according to world records posted on USAswimming.com, followed by butterfly, backstroke and breaststroke, the slowest competitive swimming stroke.