Is it OK to dive with a cold?

Can you dive if you have a cold?

If you do a self-assessment and you have persistent or worsening congestion and any other symptoms, you should consider yourself sick. Then the question is whether you’re too sick to dive. A relentlessly blocked-up head is unsafe for scuba. You won’t be able to clear your ears and sinuses while descending.

Can I scuba dive with a cough?

If your cough involves expectorating congestion or mucus from throat or lungs, I suggest you not dive. Without being vivid, you could “aspirate your expectoration” and choke or gag. Also, a persistent “dry cough” suggests, as noted above, that diving should be left to another day.

How long after a cold can you scuba dive?

For the common cold, it takes me a week to get over my congestion and runny nose. 2 weeks for my sinuses to clear up. And 3 weeks for my cough to go away. As long as you can equalize and perform up to par then I say it’s safe to go diving.

What happens if I scuba dive with a cold?

What problems can this cause when diving? If you’re not able to equalise your ears and sinuses properly, this may cause: Middle ear barotrauma- ear pain and hearing loss. Inner ear barotrauma- ear pain, hearing loss, tinnitus, dizziness, nausea, vomiting.

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How do I clear my sinuses before scuba diving?

Nasal Saline Spray

Make sure to read the bottle and verify that it is natural saline spray and that it is free of any medications. A couple of squirts up each nostril before you dive may irrigate your sinuses enough to provide relief and allow you to equalize them efficiently.

Can you dive with chest congestion?

Avoid diving too soon after a chest cold or respiratory infection. This means that no matter how good you feel, don’t dive if you are coughing up mucus, or if your breathing produces any abnormal noise or resistance. To reduce the tendency for mucus obstruction after a chest cold, drink plenty of water before diving.

Can you take a decongestant before diving?

Nasal decongestants are generally not a good idea under water: most wear off too rapidly and you may wind up with a ‘rebound’ effect, and in worse condition than when you started. People who require decongestants in order to dive are already at increased risk of injury due to higher pressure (barotrauma).

Can I dive with allergies?

In general, individuals with environmental allergies may dive safely. Only during severe flare-ups should the symptoms preclude the safe use of scuba equipment.

Can you sneeze while diving?

Divers may have the ability to breathe underwater, but we’re still human. There may come a time when you need to cough, sneeze, vomit, or experience vertigo underwater. It’s perfectly alright to cough into your regulator until your airway is clear. …

Can you scuba dive with bronchitis?

Bronchitis is an inflammatory condition of the airways of the lung. It directly affects the lungs ability to move air and may affect the normal gas exchange. … At no time should an individual with bronchitis dive without first being treated and cleared by an appropriate diving medical officer.

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