What kind of sailboat Do you need to sail around the world?

How much money do I need to sail around the world?

Skip to the quick answer

You could spend from as little as $700 or as much as $3,000 a month for two people – it all depends on what boat you have, who does your boat work, where you cruise, how you like to spend your time, and more. Let’s look at the expenses you’ll likely encounter when sailing around the world.

What is a good size sailboat to live on?

For a sailboat to be considered as a liveaboard, it needs to be at least 30ft. Anything smaller and the boat will be cramped for anyone other than a solo sailor. However, the larger the boat, the greater the cost of ownership. The ideal size sailboat to live on would be 35-45 feet for most people.

How safe is it to sail around the world?

Statistically speaking, sailing is one of the safest ways of seeing the world. But you can make it more dangerous if you’re not careful. The problem of piracy highlighted in our current (March) issue and the proliferation of attacks throughout the Indian Ocean is but one example.

How much does an ocean worthy sailboat cost?

In this article, I’ll show you what to expect. Sure, superyachts are expensive, but so is everything super (except for maybe supermarkets). But a modest, used sailboat can be as cheap as $1,500 and an additional $1,400 per year. How much does the average sailboat cost?

One-Time Costs:

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Cost
Total one-time cost $23,860

What is the best way to sail around the world?

The safest sailing route around the world is to stay as close to the equator as possible to make use of the more favorable winds there. This route requires sailing through the Panama and Suez Canals, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean, the South Pacific, and the Atlantic.

How do I choose a bluewater sailboat?

What to Consider in a Bluewater Cruiser

  1. Hallberg-Rassy yachts like the H-R 40 are archetypal bluewater designs. …
  2. Fin and spade boats are perfectly capable of going blue-water.
  3. Many bluewater sailors like the rudder and prop protection offered by a full keel.
  4. Askeg-hung rudder (A) is less vulnerable than a spade rudder (B)